Brewery Glove Selection Tool

Glove material

Intended use

Advantages and disadvantages

Example Photos

Latex (natural rubber) Incidental contact
  • Good for biological and water-based materials.
  • Poor for organic solvents.
  • Little chemical protection.
  • Hard to detect puncture holes.
  • Can cause or trigger latex allergies
latexglove.jpg
Nitrile Incidental contact (disposable exam glove)
Extended contact (thicker reusable glove)
  • Excellent general use glove. Good for solvents, oils, greases, and some acids and bases.
  • A clear indication of tears and breaks.

A good alternative for those with latex allergies.

Butyl rubber Extended contact
  • Good for ketones and esters.Poor for gasoline and aliphatic, aromatic, and halogenated hydrocarbons.
Neoprene Extended contact
  • Good for acids, bases, alcohols, fuels, peroxides, hydrocarbons, and phenols.
  • Poor for halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons.
  • Good for most hazardous chemicals.
Norfoil Extended contact
  • Good for most hazardous chemicals.
  • Poor fit (Note: Dexterity can be partially regained by using a heavier weight Nitrile glove over the Norfoil/Silver Shield glove.
Viton Extended contact
  • Good for chlorinated and aromatic solvents.
  • Good resistance to cuts and abrasions.
  • Poor for ketones.
  • Expensive.
Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) Specific use
  • Good for acids, bases, oils, fats, peroxides, and amines.
  • Good resistance to abrasions.
  • Poor for most organic solvents.
Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) Specific use
  • Good for aromatic and chlorinated solvents.
  • Poor for water-based solutions.
Stainless steel
Kevlar
Leather
Specific use Cut-resistant gloves.
Sleeves are also available to provide protection to wrists and forearms.
(If the potential for biological or chemical contamination: wear appropriate disposable gloves on top of your cut-resistant gloves and discard after use).

Cryogenic Resistant Material
Leather
Specific use For use with cryogenic materials.
Designed to prevent frostbite. Note: Never dip gloves directly into liquid nitrogen.
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